Alumni

Camilla Blasi-Foglietti

 

PhD Student in Biological Sciences Royal Holloway 2020

I started my PhD in September 2016. My PhD focussed on the effect of hunting pressures on primate behaviour in the Gola Forest of Liberia and Sierra Leone. I investigated spatial variation in hunting pressure and monkey behaviour, and used simulations to determine the effect of behavioural changes on estimates of primate densities. My PhD thesis can be found here. After graduating in 2020, I went to work for UNEP-WCMC on the UKRI GCRF Trade Development and the Environment hub and the Development Corridors Partnership.

 

Click on my image to find out more about me and my project!

Sorrel Jones

 

PhD Student Royal Holloway 

I started my PhD in September 2016. My PhD focused on monitoring hunting around the Gola Forest, Liberia to support the implementation of the GolaMA project. I used market segmentation techniques to identify different groups of hunter, household surveys and hunter interviews to understand the Liberia bushmeat system. I also used the bean method to measure bushmeat hunting and trading, and contrasted estimates of offtake when using different monitoring methods. During my PhD I worked with, and was partially funded by RSPB Liberia. My PhD thesis can be found here. After graduating in 2020, I went to work the RSPB as a social scientist for Gola Forest in Sierra Leone.

Chloë Metcalfe

MSc in Biological Sciences by Research Royal Holloway 2018

I started my MSc in September 2017, after completing my undergraduate degree in Zoology at Royal Holloway. For my MSc project, I studied the impact of humans on the behaviour of large-headed capuchin monkeys in the Pacaya-Samiria Nature Reserve in the Peruvian Amazon. In September 2019, I started my PhD with the London NERC doctoral training program.  

Polly Curtin

 

Research assistant on the imaginary animals project

I joined CABLab in April 2019 to work on the imaginary animals, but before my MSc I did my undergraduate degree at Royal Holloway, and you can read the publication which resulted from my third year project here, or watch a short video here. After the imaginary animals project ended, I went on to work as a graduate consultant for Atkins.

Millie Hawkins

MSc in Biological Sciences by Research Royal Holloway 2019

I started my MSc in September 2018. I used playback experiments to investigate the response of pygmy marmosets to anthropogenic noise at an ecotourism site, Tahuayo lodge, in the Peruvian Amazon, and also investigated whether informing tourists of the effects of noise changed their behavioural intentions.

Alice Samuel

MSc in Biological Sciences by Research Royal Holloway 2018

I started my MSc in September 2017. My project investigated how captive ring-tailed lemurs interacted with humans in walk-through enclosures at four different zoos. 

I started my MSc in September 2019. I investigated vocal behaviour of pygmy marmosets near Tahuayo Lodge, an ecotourism site in the Peruvian Amazon. I analysed vocalisations from Audiomoth passive acoustic monitoring devices. After finishing my MSc, I went to work with mandrills in Gabon for a year. 

Erin Mason

MSc in Biological Sciences by Research Royal Holloway 2019

I started my MSc in September 2018. I investigated the vocalisations and other behavioural responses of saki monkeys when they encounter humans near an ecotourism site, Tahuayo lodge, in the Peruvian Amazon.

Rebecca Sheehan

MSc Biological Sciences by Research Royal Holloway 2017

My MSc project investigated the behavioural responses of pygmy marmosets to anthropogenic noise through the use of a playback experiment playing recordings of human speech at different volumes and lengths. My research showed that pygmy marmosets spent less time feeding and resting after playbacks of human speech. As the volume of the playbacks increased, individuals were more likely to move out of sight. These results were published in the American Journal of Primatology. I hope the results can inform ecotourism operators on the level of noise that is “acceptable” from tourist groups when viewing wild primates.   

Luke Collins

MSc in Biological Sciences by Research Royal Holloway 2020 

CONSERVATION and BEHAVIOUR

(CAB LAB)

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